November 28, 2014


The role and interaction of microgrids and centralized grids in developing modern power systems

An extension of microgrids is now underway, primarily to allow increased electrification in growing economies but also to meet the need to reduce global CO2 emissions and to provide ancillary services to centralized grids.

Energy access constitutes one of the fundamental building blocks for economic growth as well as social equity in the modern world. Access to sustainable energy is needed to achieve sustainable development. A microgrid should not be seen as a competitor to the centralized grid but as a complement.

Through examination of several implemented cases from different parts of the world the following topics are considered:

  • Analysis of the interaction between centralized grids and microgrids
  • Analysis of stakeholder decision parameters for electrification
  • Analysis of design differences and requirements for microgrids, depending on the intended purpose and the need of the end customers

It is determined that good planning, suitable requirements and clear regulations for microgrids (in relation to centralized grids) limits the risk of stranded assets and enables better business cases for the involved stakeholders.
The paper is based on the discussion paper The role and interaction of microgrids and centralized grids in developing modern power systems – A case review publiced by ISGAN (International Smart Grid Action Network) Annex 6: Power T&D Systems.


read more
share

September 22, 2014


Spotlight on Advanced Metering Infrastructure

The AMI case book includes six case studies providing qualitative insights into the potential costs and benefits of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), and the associated business cases for investment.

Each case presented has its own unique set of characteristics and drivers, which is indicative of the diverse range of motivating drivers for smart grid and AMI globally.

The lessons learned and best practices presented in the six case studies included in this case book provide qualitative insights into the potential costs and benefits of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), and the associated business cases for investment. Each case presented has its own unique set of characteristics and drivers, which is indicative of the diverse range of motivating drivers for smart grid and AMI globally. It follows then that the specific costs, benefits and business cases vary from case to case. Still. there are a number of best practices and common themes emerging from these cases that are likely to be useful for any jurisdiction investigating or deploying AMI.Those common best practices and insights are presented here.

It should be noted that these six cases represent only a portion of global experience in considering and deploying AMI. In addition, AMI is only one system of technologies among a broad menu of options that can constitute a “smart grid.” Some countries consider an AMI a prerequisite for their smart grid, while others have dismissed the importance of AMI to grid modernization. Additional cases have been solicited or are under development that will enlarge global understanding of the role AMI can play as one possible component of smarter electricity networks worldwide.


read more
share

September 7, 2014


Smart Grid Drivers and Technologies by Country, Economies, and Continent

This report summarizes the unified assessment framework used in the 2014 survey, the analysis methodology, and the analysis results of smart grid motivating drivers and technologies at both the national level and multinational level.

Building on the lists of smart grid motivating drivers and technologies that were used for the 2012 survey, the assessment framework in 2014 was developed with slight refinements to reflect review feedback from current ISGAN Participants. The refined framework (i.e., lists of drivers and technologies) was then programmed into an online survey tool for use by each Participant to complete the assessment. Each Participant’s survey results were subjected to a validation process by that country’s national coordinator for Annex 1. A clustering analysis methodology was developed and applied to derive the composite, national-level prioritized assessment results from survey results (those approved through validation, or completed but not yet validated) from multiple respondents for a country. The same methodology was further applied to groups of multiple Participants’ prioritized assessment results to identify motivating drivers and technology priorities at a multinational level. Clustering analysis for the group of all ISGAN Participants, as well as of Participants grouped by economies (developed and developing) and by continent (Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America), was conducted; these multinational-level prioritized assessment results are provided herein. Lastly, application of national-level and multinational-level prioritized assessment results for selecting each country’s smart grid projects for the ISGAN Inventory and for further information dissemination via the ISGAN Smart Grid Project Webinar Series is described.


read more
share

August 17, 2014


TSO-DSO interaction

An Overview of current interaction between transmission and distribution system operators and an assessment of their cooperation in Smart Grids.

Evolutions in the grid operation sector will require an ever closer cooperation between Transmission System Operators and Distribution System Operators. The current interaction between TSOs and DSOs has been investigated for six specified grid operation challenges, and possible future ways of cooperation have been identified. Technical aspects as well as policy aspects have been taken into account.
The technical requirements for an evolved interaction between TSOs and DSOs can be met using available technology. However, several non-technical issues and points of discussion have been identified, of which some are related to the regulated environment grid operators are working in.


read more
share

February 28, 2014


The Smart & Strong Grid: Connecting Clean Energy with People

To create a seamless cost-effective electricity system, from generation to end use, capable of meeting all energy demand and capacity requirements, while allowing consumer participation and electricity use as desired.


read more
share

February 28, 2014


An International Review of the Development of Technologies for Smart Grid

Flexible and resilient electricity systems are vital to the deployment and integration of many clean energy technologies. Electricity networks worldwide are under increasing stress, because the sources and uses of electric power are becoming progressively more varied and complex.

A growing amount of variable renewable energy generation, coupled with increasing consumer involvement through micro generation and flexible demand management, challenge the old ways of planning, operating, and investing in power systems.

In most developed countries, the existing electric infrastructure and workforce is rapidly aging, while in many developing countries, demand for electricity is rapidly rising. Across this landscape of change, it is crucial for policy-makers to understand the synergies between grids and information and communication technologies. Only smart and strong grids will connect people with reliable clean energy. This paper presents a part of the work being done within ISGAN Annex 6 on Power T&D Systems. International Smart Grid Action Network (ISGAN) is an initiative within the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) and an Implementing Agreement within the International Energy Agency (IEA). For more information please go to www.iea-isgan.org, or www.cleanenergyministerial.org/Our-Work/Initiatives/Smart-Grid.

This work involves the major economies and consequently major energy users in the world and is addressing the challenges for a secure and clean energy system including the concerns put forward by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). IEA publish regularly the reports World Energy Outlook (WEO) and Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP). In addition IEA has published a number of Technology Roadmaps, e.g. on Smart Grids, Wind Energy, Concentrating Solar Power (CSP), Solar PV Energy and Energy Storage. All scenarios showed by IEA are indicating a further increase of electricity as energy carrier both due to the integration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) and due to increased electricity consumption in many countries, besides common applications also due to increased use of home electronics, heat pumps, air conditioning and electrical transportation (e.g. electrical vehicles, high speed trains). Increased variable electricity production (large scale and distributed) will require mitigation from storage and/or demand response. This will give further demands for capacity, flexibility and reliability of the future power T&D system.


read more
share

February 28, 2014


The role and interaction of microgrids and centralized grids in developing modern power systems

A rapid expansion of the introduction of microgrids is underway universally, primarily to allow increased electrification in growing economies, but also to meet the need to reduce global CO2 emissions and to provide ancillary services to centralized grids.

Energy access constitutes one of the fundamental building blocks for economic growth, as well as social equity, in the modern world. Access to sustainable energy is needed to achieve sustainable development. This paper serves as an input document to the global discussion on how to reach the UN goal of “Sustainable Energy for All”, by sharing case study knowledge in the field. The following topics are considered through the examination of several implemented cases from different parts of the world:

  • Analysis of the interaction between centralized grids and microgrids.
  • Analysis of stakeholder decision parameters for electrification through extension of the central grid or microgrids; such as distance from grid, economic feasibility and environmental sustainability.
  • Analysis of design differences and requirements for microgrids, based on intended purpose and the needs of the end customer.

It has been determined that good planning, appropriate requirements and clear regulations for microgrids limit the risk of stranded assets and enable better business cases for the involved stakeholders.


read more
share

February 22, 2014


Spotlight on Demand Side Management 1.0

The lessons learned and best practices presented in the twelve case studies included in this case book provide qualitative insights into the complexity of deploying Demand Side Management (DSM) initiatives.

These case studies are based on a diverse range of technologies and under specific market rules. They incorporate various program and policy mechanisms and include information on costs and the associated business cases for investment. Each case presented has its own unique set of characteristics and drivers, which is indicative of the diverse range of drivers for smart grid and DSM.

The cases are at very different stages throughout the world. While some countries have completed first rounds of pilots and are building on lessons learned, the others are at earliest stage of these initiatives. The size, customer class, choice of technologies deployed, specific costs, benefits and business cases vary from case to case. Still, there are a number of best practices and common themes emerging from these cases that are likely to be useful for any stakeholder investigating or deploying Demand Side Management. Those best practices and insights are presented here.

The key findings are a synthesis attempt of the broad range of the approaches tackled by the different smart grid demonstrators described by the 12 cases. It highlights the main lessons learned and best practices shared by the participating cases. These lessons learned mainly concerns technical approaches, customer engagement and market establishment.


read more
share
×